Other Projects

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Screen grab of distributed conference “nodes” from the Displacements 2018 conference. https://displacements.jhu.edu/nodes/

Distribute 2020: The Biennial Conference of the Society for Cultural Anthropology and Society for Visual Anthropology
Time: May 7-9, 2020
Location: Everywhere 

In partnership with UC Santa Cruz and the Santa Cruz Center for Social Transformation, the University of Toronto is digitally hosting Distribute 2020. This is an “international experiment in carbon-conscious, radically distributed conferencing.” I am proud to play a small part in organizing this inspiring event at U of T.
https://distribute.utoronto.ca

 

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Occupy Wall Street Protest in front of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s apartment building. Manhattan, NY, 2011. Photograph by Farzaneh Hemmasi.

Rhythms of Social Change: Time, Rhythm & Pace in Performance January 7, 2017

Rhythms of Social Change was an interdisciplinary symposium of University of Toronto faculty and graduate students intended to stimulate scholarly exchange on the interrelationships between time, rhythm, and pace in performance and social movements, broadly defined. Among the questions we ask are, Why is performance so often tasked with evincing rupture with the past and creating a new era? How do artists and the arts perform and even advance the pace of social change? And how are the rhythmic and temporal aspects of music, dance, and theatre implicated in political communication?  The symposium was supported by the Jackman Humanities Institute Program on the Arts and the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music.
Link to symposium website

Symposium Program

12:30 PM | Panel 1 Social Change & Performance in North America
Karyn Recollet |Assistant Professor in the Institute for Women and Gender Studies
GESTURING INDIGENOUS FUTURITIES THROUGH THE REMIX

Gabriela Jiménez | PhD Candidate in Ethnomusicology
REPARATIVE RHYTHMS: VERSIONING MEXICANIDAD AND PERFORMING MEXICAN ENOUGH THROUGH REGGAETÓN IN CONTEMPORARY MEXICO CITY

Seika Boye | Director, Centre for Dance & Instructor,Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies
DANCING OVER THE SLOW PACE OF CHANGE: AFRICAN CANADIAN DANCE VENUES IN MID-CENTURY TORONTO

2:45 | Panel 2 Rhythm & Revolution

Xing Fan | Assistant Professor of Asian Theatre and Performance Studies
PERFORMING THE RHYTHMS OF MODERNITY IN CHINESE REVOLUTIONARY THEATRE

Polina Dessianitchenko | PhD Candidate in Ethnomusicology
NATIONAL IN FORM, SOCIALIST IN CONTENT: CIVILIZING THE TEMPORALITY OF MUGHAM IN SOVIET AZERBAIJAN

Farzaneh Hemmasi | Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology
NEW TIME, NEW RHYTHM: SONIC & POLITICAL CHANGE IN 20TH CENTURY IRANIAN MUSIC

4:30 | Panel 3 Social & Musical Movements in East Asia

Yurou Zhong | Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies
THE RHYTHMS OF CLASS-CONSCIOUSNESS: THE CASE OF THE CHINESE NEW WORKERS ART MOVEMENT

Nate Renner | PhD Candidate in Ethnomusicology
TRADITIONAL AINU MUSIC IN CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE ENVIRONMENTALISM

Joshua Pilzer | Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology
DISABILITY, MUSIC, MOVEMENT & ACTIVISM AMONG KOREAN RADIATION SUFFERERS: THE RHYTHMS OF SURVIVAL


Working Group
Critical Approaches to Middle East Studies:
Subjects, Culture, Political Formations | 2016-2017

In 2016, Dr. Jairan Gahan, Prof. Sara Saljoughi, Alia O’Brien and I initiated a Working Group on Critical Approaches to Middle East Studies with the support of U of T’s  Jackman Humanities Institute.

Description | This working group investigates the creation of ethical subjects, political formations, digital culture, and cultural production in dialogue with ongoing debates in contemporary Islam. The twentieth and twenty-first century have seen the constant remaking of Middle Eastern states, a process that is always also predicated upon cultural transformation and new conceptualizations of ideal subjects. Today, some 40 years since the 1970s-era “Islamic Revival” and five years beyond the Arab Uprisings, is an ideal moment to observe how Islamic counterpublics have formed and reformed in a spectrum of relationships to changing states, institutions, and communicative media, both within nation-states and in diaspora. We are interested in tracing how “Islamic values” have been (re)conceptualized and deployed in cultural production of all kinds, and how discourses of ethical subjecthood and citizenship have emerged as both preconditions and effects of political-cultural projects of social transformation.

Readings include Hossein Agrama, Talal Asad, Lara Deeb, Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi, Mona Harb, Charles Hirschkind, Saba Mahmoud, Kamran Rastegar, & Samuli Schielke.